Making Room

Platzpro­jekt is part of the port­fo­lio of places with which the cul­tur­al office of the city admin­is­tra­tion of Hanover is com­pet­ing as a can­di­date for the Euro­pean Cap­i­tal of Cul­ture 2025.

About six­teen years ago, two skaters found a plot of fal­low land in Hanover-Linden’s indus­tri­al area. They start to clean up and build a small skate park. In 2009, they form an asso­ci­a­tion, nego­ti­ate an inter­im use con­tract with the own­er togeth­er with the city council’s sup­port, and reach a lease agree­ment for one euro per year, which is still valid today. In 2013, anoth­er asso­ci­a­tion is cre­at­ed: Platzpro­jekt aims to cre­ate a space for ini­tia­tives, a place for self-help, for mutu­al sup­port offer­ing knowl­edge, tools, and crafts­man­ship. Research funds and state sub­si­dies enable the estab­lish­ment of long-term par­tic­i­pa­tion struc­tures for young peo­ple who want to dis­cuss their cities in self-orga­nized spaces and active­ly shape them.


Project

PlatzPro­jekt


Actors

PlatzPro­jekt e.V., respon­si­ble body; City of Hanover, co-financ­ing, nego­ti­a­tion; Metro Group, land own­er­ship; Fed­er­al Min­istry of the Envi­ron­ment, co-financing


Year

Since 2013, found­ing of the association


Loca­tion

Hanover, Ger­many

© Chi­na Hopson
In 2004, a group of skaters occu­pied an over­grown piece of land in an indus­tri­al area in the west of Han­nover. The city admin­is­tra­tion and the dis­trict may­or Rain­er-Jörg Grube sup­port­ed the project by sign­ing a lease and extend­ing the activ­i­ties to a neigh­bor­ing prop­er­ty. © Philip Robin­son Crusius
© Sam Green

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Lived Space

Kot­ti (revis­it­ed), Fine Art Print, 157×160 cm, 2014 © Laris­sa Fassler

Laris­sa Fassler builds and draws space. Yet noth­ing here is cleaned up or ordered accord­ing to scale. In the large-for­mat draw­ings of cities, she shows us what we expe­ri­ence when we walk over traf­fic islands, through under­pass­es, and pas­sages, or into the entrances of build­ings. The artist over­lays the built space with appro­pri­a­tions. She observes and walks through the space over and over again, col­lect­ing and map­ping what she finds. This is also the case with her work Kot­ti (revis­it­ed). The many frag­ments lay­ered on top of each oth­er tell sto­ries of a com­plex space that proud­ly says: »I am city. I am nei­ther easy to under­stand nor easy to plan. I will defend myself if you seek to ques­tion my exis­tence.« The big col­or­ful pic­ture calls for plan­ning to take care of and work with lived space instead of against it. Because where is this city going to go if it has to leave here?


Project

Kot­ti (revis­it­ed)


Artist

Laris­sa Fassler


Year

2014


Loca­tion

Berlin, Ger­many

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How Residential Areas Become Car-Free

The urban plan­ning sys­tem for the expan­sion of Barcelona, con­ceived under the Cata­lan urban plan­ner Ilde­fons Cerdà in the mid-19th cen­tu­ry, envis­aged build­ing on only two edges of the block. But spec­u­la­tion with land, sim­i­lar to Berlin, led to a much high­er den­si­ty of devel­op­ment than planned. Many of Cerdà’s visions remained unful­filled, such as the estab­lish­ment of large green court­yards. The result­ing extreme­ly dense urban fab­ric has been under increas­ing stress in recent years—it was over­loaded. © Iakov Filimonov/123RF.com

In Barcelona, the idea of the superblock—an urban area made up of sev­er­al small­er city blocks and bor­dered by large streets—has been rein­vent­ed in recent years. It promis­es solu­tions for cities with high emis­sion lev­els caused by motor­ized vehi­cles. The reduc­tion of traf­fic means that the val­ue of pub­lic spaces increas­es or that a space becomes tru­ly pub­lic for the first time, and exist­ing uses are increased or new ones made pos­si­ble. Six such superblocks have been real­ized in Barcelona to date. Fears that the retail trade would suf­fer as a result of reduced access for cars have not come true. Instead, the num­ber of trips made on foot or by bicy­cle have gone up and the air qual­i­ty has improved. In recent years, oth­er cities have also begun to imple­ment the mod­el since its poten­tial becomes appar­ent every­where when you look at the city from the per­spec­tive of those who walk instead of drive.


Project

Super­illes, Superblocks


BeteActorsiligte

Sal­vador Rue­da, Direc­tor of BCNe­colo­gia (2000 — 2019), BCNe­colo­gia (Agència d’Ecologia Urbana de Barcelona; Con­sor­tium of Ajun­ta­ment de Barcelona, l’A ea Met­ro­pol­i­tana de Barcelona i la Diputa­ció de Barcelona), superblocks residents


Year

Since 2003, Wirst test superblock in the Grà­cia dis­trict; 2016, inau­gu­ra­tion superblock in the Poble­nou district


Loca­tion

Barcelona, Spain

The var­i­ous prob­lems that had devel­oped due to the immense den­si­ty of the blocks, above all the scarce pub­lic space and the dev­as­tat­ing air qual­i­ty, were to be coun­ter­act­ed with the con­cept of the Superblock. The prin­ci­ple: four to nine blocks are com­bined into one large unit. In addi­tion, the streets are calmed or com­plete­ly closed to through traf­fic. © Ajun­ta­ment de Barcelona
The space freed from car traf­fic can be used in many ways. Addi­tion­al green spaces, sports and play­grounds can be cre­at­ed where motor­ized traf­fic used to dom­i­nate. © Ajun­ta­ment de Barcelona
The upgrad­ing of pub­lic space is man­i­fold and com­plex. Yet many are still skep­ti­cal. Plan­ners are ask­ing where the traf­fic is now that pre­vi­ous­ly rolled over the now calmer streets? And res­i­dents won­der whether the already strong tourist pres­sure on the city could be fur­ther increased by mea­sures that make this quar­ter even more attrac­tive? © Ajun­ta­ment de Barcelona

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From Locomotive Workshop to Library

© Sti­jn Bollaert

In 2009, the munic­i­pal­i­ty of Tilburg, togeth­er with two large real estate and con­struc­tion groups, acquired a mas­sive plot direct­ly behind the main rail­way sta­tion. The orig­i­nal plan was to demol­ish exist­ing build­ings, such as the for­mer loco­mo­tive hall, or LocHal for short, and to con­struct huge office and apart­ment com­plex­es. How­ev­er, the deci­sion was reversed. Instead of demo­li­tion, rede­vel­op­ment and con­ver­sions took root. And so, in 2019, the munic­i­pal library—which is much more than just a col­lec­tion of books—opened here. Its glass hall pro­tects an inner-city square with a café and open stair­case. There are also archives, offices, as well as event rooms and, on the perime­ters, work­shop areas and small meet­ing rooms. The many peo­ple who use the build­ing for a wide range of activ­i­ties make it clear that pub­lic space will con­tin­ue to play an essen­tial role in the future.


Project

LocHal


Actors

CIVIC Archi­tects, Braaks­ma & Roos archi­tecten­bu­reau, Inside Out­side / Petra Blaisse, Mecanoo, archi­tects; Gemeente Tilburg, De Bib­lio­theek Mid­den-Bra­bant, Kun­st­loc Bra­bant, commission


Year

Since 2019


Loca­tion

Tilburg Nether­lands

The for­mer work­shop where loco­mo­tives were assem­bled and main­tained. Archive image © Civic Architects
© Sti­jn Bollaert
© Sti­jn Bollaert
Aer­i­al pic­ture of the rail­road area in the Dutch city of Tilburg. © Karel Tomei

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Participation in City Design

More than 400 peo­ple assem­bled at a self orga­nized meet­ing in FC St. Pauli’s ball­room in Ham­burg in Feb­ru­ary 2014. The rea­son for the unusu­al gath­er­ing were dra­mat­ic changes in St. Pauli. The neigh­bor­hood called for a »bot­tom up-orga­nized, demo­c­ra­t­ic plan­ning process.« With the expe­ri­ence and the mobi­liza­tion pow­er of the broad Right-to-the-city-move­ment back­ing them, the inter­dis­ci­pli­nary plan­ning office Plan­bude is found­ed to devel­op a new land use plan for the city. Wish pro­duc­tion starts in late sum­mer. Planbude’s claim: »Knack’ den St. Pauli Code!« (Crack the St. Pauli code!) becomes the leit­mo­tif for a process that builds on mul­ti­lin­gual­ism in expres­sion and mak­ing. The results of the process are cap­tured in a con­tract and become the foun­da­tion for a plan­ning com­pe­ti­tion. Local knowl­edge builds the basis for the rein­ven­tion of the city.


Project

Plan­Bude / Crack the St. Pauli Code


Actors

Mar­git Czen­ki, Christoph Schäfer, Renée Trib­ble, Lisa Marie Zan­der, Christi­na Röthig, until 2018, Patri­cia Wedler, until 2017, Volk­er Kattha­gen, until 2016, neigh­bor­hood ini­tia­tives and residents


Year

Since 2014


Loca­tion

Ham­burg, Germany

The Esso Hous­es at Spiel­bu­den­platz in Hamburg’s St. Pauli dis­trict were built in the late 1950s and were con­sid­ered at risk of col­lapse in the ear­ly 2010s. They were demol­ished in 2014—under great protest. Doris Antony (CC BY-SA 4.0)
Plan­bude orga­nizes civ­il soci­ety resis­tance to the plans of the Ham­burg Sen­ate for the site, which has now been vacat­ed. The Plan­bude will be set up on site to absorb and artic­u­late the wish­es of the city soci­ety for the quar­ter. © Mar­git Czenki
Plan­bude func­tions as a meet­ing place, a cen­ter for research, a neigh­bor­hood library, exhi­bi­tion space and dis­cus­sion plat­form. It is not only a place from which wish­es are col­lect­ed, but also where con­crete demands for the new plan­ning at Spiel­bu­den­platz are set up. © Frank Egel Photography
The Dutch archi­tec­tur­al office NL-Archi­tects and BEL-Archi­tects from Cologne won the com­pe­ti­tion Spiel­bu­den­platz with a coura­geous design. © Bay­erische Hausbau

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A Different Kind of City Kitchen

The kitchen of Urban Space 100 finances a vari­ety of urban projects ini­ti­at­ed by civ­il soci­ety, such as the ren­o­va­tion of cul­tur­al her­itage, street music days, com­put­er work­shops for chil­dren or recy­cling sta­tions for plas­tics. © Teple Misto

When Yuriy Fylyuk and his friends moved from Kyiv to Ivano-Frankivsk in the sum­mer of 2008, they found a place with scarci­ties of all sorts. Out of this, Teple Mis­to or Warm City emerged—a net­work that today includes around six­ty local com­pa­nies. A restau­rant became one of the plat­forms for the group’s activ­i­ties and serves as a place for meet­ing as well as exchange. One hun­dred peo­ple par­tic­i­pate as co-financiers in the Urban Space 100 project. Since 2015, parts of the restaurant’s prof­its have gone into a pot that finances and sup­ports ini­tia­tives, small and larg­er projects. The mon­ey col­lect­ed in this way has already been used to restore his­toric build­ing entrances, pro­cure com­put­ers for med­ical facil­i­ties, and orga­nize sport­ing events and festivals.


Project

Urban Space 100


Actors

Yuriy Fylyuk and Wifty-two oth­er busi­ness­men, found­ing Teple Mis­to; Yuriy Fylyuk and six friends, devel­op­ing the idea of Urban Space 100; Teple Mis­to, man­ag­ing Pro­stir 100; 100 co-founders, Winanc­ing Pro­stir 100; Pro­stir 100 (NGO), allo­cat­ing grants; Restoran 100, restau­rant oper­a­tor; 23 Restoran, restau­rant man­age­ment company


Year

Since 2014, restau­rant opening


Loca­tion

Ivano-Frankivsk, Ukraine

The Urban Space 100 at 19 Mykhaila Hru­shevsko­ho Street in Ivano-Frankivsk—a com­bi­na­tion of restau­rant, radio sta­tion and com­mu­ni­ty center—has been around since 2014. The idea for this place was gen­er­at­ed by the Teple Mis­to Plat­form, which was respon­si­ble for the pub­lic rela­tions work for the project and was also look­ing for the founders: 100 peo­ple, all of whom want­ed to play an active role in shap­ing their liv­ing envi­ron­ment. They do this by invest­ing 80% of the prof­its from the restau­rant in social­ly com­mit­ted and non-prof­it projects. On four dates a year, the mem­bers select projects that should be fur­ther sup­port­ed. © Teple Misto
© Ste­fan Marx

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The Cooperative Housing Project Above a Tram Depot

© Mar­tin Stollenwerk

The large, up to sev­en-sto­ry res­i­den­tial and com­mer­cial build­ing in Zurich’s Wiedikon dis­trict is any­thing but ordi­nary. The build­ing is like a small town: com­plete with day­care cen­ter, doctor’s office, bank, art-house cin­e­ma, bars, restau­rant, flower shop, and tram depot. Fur­ther­more, Kalk­bre­ite is a cer­ti­fied »2000 Watt site in oper­a­tion«: Through active sus­tain­abil­i­ty mea­sures, those liv­ing and work­ing there reduce their eco­log­i­cal foot­print. Peo­ple cook and eat togeth­er, work­rooms are shared, an object library makes it pos­si­ble to bor­row equip­ment, and no one has their own car. The result­ing sav­ings are cur­rent­ly around 50% com­pared to aver­age house­hold usage in Zurich. The vision­ary approach of the Kalk­bre­ite will, in the long term, be applied to the entire city in order to con­tribute marked­ly to cli­mate justice.


Project

Res­i­den­tial and com­mer­cial build­ing Kalkbreite


Actors

Genossen­schaft Kalk­bre­ite, plan­ning and con­tract; Müller Sigrist Archi­tects AG, archi­tec­ture office; HAAG. LA, land­scape archi­tec­ture; City of Zurich, property


Year

Since 2006, work­shop stadt. labor / »Visions for the Kalk­bre­ite Site«; 2014, build­ing occupancy


Loca­tion

Zurich, Switzer­land

Genossen­schaft Kalk­bre­ite, Zurich, Müller Sigrist Architek­ten © Michael Egloff
In addi­tion to the pub­licly acces­si­ble inner court­yard of Kalk­bre­ite, which is locat­ed above the street­car hall of the depot, there are oth­er out­door spaces such as the acces­si­ble roof areas, which are only acces­si­ble to the res­i­dents of the block. © Genossen­schaft Kalk­bre­ite, Volk­er Schopp
© Genossen­schaft Kalk­bre­ite, Volk­er Schopp

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